The Photos Sample Chapters About the CD RomTake me home, Daddy!


The Complete Yachtsman

The Complete Yachtsman, by B. Heckstall-Smith and Captain E. du Boulay. Third edition, revised, copyright 1918. This newly-completed CD Rom is a complete historical treatise on the world of Victorian yachting. 483 pages long, it features sections on yacht racing, cruising, rules of the road, yacht handling, yachting history, etc. It even includes construction details for building a 20-foot lapstrake daysailer. Very interesting historical reading.

$10.00

CONTENTS
 
CHAPTER I
The embryo yachtsman- learning the rudiments of rowing and sailing in a hired boat-Dinghy sailing-First lesson in his own boat-A capsize-Righting the boat again-A larger sailing boat, and how to handle her cost-Camping and coastal cruising-What to practise and study 15
 
CHAPTER II
Building one's own boat-A. study of "lines" and what they mean-Construction. and specification of boat to be built-Tools, materials, and timber required-Laying off, making and erecting the moulds-Building-Spars, rigging, and sails- Painting-Launching 31
 
CHAPTER III
Sailing the new boat-How to get under way-Laying to-Picking tip a man overboard- Picking up moorings -Anchoring-Mooring-Giving a sheer to a boat at anchor 57
 
CHAPTER IV
Yacht rigging, various component parts of-Flax, hemp, and cotton- Strength and weight of hemp ropes-Wire ropes, their strength and weight-Chains, their strength and weight-Various knots, seizings, and lashings-Splicing hemp ropes-Splicing wire ropes- Ornamental knots -Sundry ornamental work-Blocks and tackles 72
 
CHAPTER V
Seamanship: A yacht owner should become a practical yachtsman-Setting the sails, mainsail, topsail, jib, foresail-Getting under way-General remarks on seamanship 121
 
CHAPTER VI
Seamanship: Handling a yacht under way-Steering Steering on a reach-Looking out for Puffs-Steering before the wind-Steering on a broad reach in a heavy sea-The modern yacht in a heavy sea-Steering to windward in a heavy sea-Handling a jib-topsail-Setting a jib-topsail- Stowing a jib-topsail-Setting a Yankee jib-topsail 134
 
CHAPTER VII
Seamanship: The duties of the crew when sailing-Taking in spinnaker- Gybing-Tacking- Lowering sails 154
 
CHAPTER VIII
Theory of tides: Rules governing them-Springs and Neaps-Various terms used in connection with tides-Tide Tables and their use-Tide diagrams -Finding the depth of water at anytime at a given place-When a yacht aground will float again-Tidal streams-Finding their direction at any time-Use and good effects of tides 172
 
CHAPTER IX
Sound signals used at sea and their meanings-Distinctive lights and signals carried by various craft-Signals of distress-British buoyage system-French buoyage system--Dutch buoyage system-Charts and
heir uses-Mercator's projection-Bearings, tides, and currents-Lead-line and sounding machines-Logs-Look-out 184
 
CHAPTER X
The rules of yacht racing-Y. R. A. and International Yacht Racing Union Rules -Management of races-Sailing rules-The rule of right of way- overtaking, etc., explained, with diagrams- Protests -Measurement rules-The International Rule of Measurement-Cabin fittings-Time Allowance Scales 203
 
CHAPTER XI
Measuring a yacht to find her rating-How to reduce the rating when she is over the limit of her class 253
 
CHAPTER XII
Racing : A typical yacht race described in detail for purpose of instruction in sailing- Handling a yacht in a race-The start 265
 
CHAPTER XIII
Racing: A typical yacht race (continued)-On the reach-The turn to windward-The run-Rounding the mark-A quartering wind and a luffing match-Reasons for luffing tactics-On a close reach-Personal comfort. 278
 
CHAPTER XIV
Racing: A typical yacht race (continued) -More turning to windward- Cross tacking-An exciting finish 305
 
CHAPTER XV
Modern comforts in yachting- Lighting of yachts below- Navigation lights -Search lights-Lifebuoy lights-Heating of yachts-Ventilation -Cold storage. 316
 
CHAPTER XVI
Motor Dinghy--Two-stroke motors - Ignition- Fitting a motor into a sailing boat-Auxiliary yachts, their advantages -Mollihawk III- Yachts' tenders -Dangers of petrol-Safety systems-Costs of running motor craft-Inland motor yachting- Hydroplanes -High-powered motors for large yachts-Diesel type of motor . 322
 
CHAPTER XVII
Buying a yacht-Surveys -Completing a purchase-Admiralty warrants-Probable costs-Changing a name-Hiring a yacht, form of agreement -Insurance of yachts-Various clauses in policies and their meanings-East Coast Mutual Assurance-What to do in cases of damage and loss. 349
 
CHAPTER XVIII
Yacht designing: Elementary yacht designing on the system of G. L. Watson -Definitions of displacement, centre of gravity, centre of buoyancy-Principle of stability-Calculation of areas and capacities- Simpson's Rule explained- Finding centres of planes and bodies-Centre of lateral resistance- H omogeneous bodies-Centre of gravity of yacht's hull and ballast-Shifting weights, adding weight-Centre of effort of sails- Rules for finding centre of gravity and centre of buoyancy 374
 
CHAPTER XIX
Yacht designing: Drawing the lines of a yacht, the profile; half-breadth plan; body plan; diagonals -Yachtsman to make his own drawings, checking and fairing the lines-Care as to intersections of water lines, buttocks, frame sections and diagonals - Drawing Materials 393
 
CHAPTER XX
Yacht designing: Applying the calculations of displacement and centre of buoyancy-Curve of sectional areas-G. L. Watson's system by four Tables 405
 
CHAPTER XXI
Yacht designing : Calculations of centre of buoyancy and displacement applied to a 7-metre racing yacht 413
 
CHAPTER XXII
Yacht designing: Remarks on stability-Wind pressure-A practical Method of finding the true measure of the stability of a yacht-The meta-Centre-Metacentric method of little practical use 422
 
CHAPTER XXIII
Ice yachts-Peculiar handling of-Real and apparent wind-How it is that yachts generally can beat to windward-Sand boats : their antiquity- Racing in Belgium-Sailing railway trolleys 430
 
CHAPTER XXIV
Sea fishing-Fishing from pier and rocks- Hand-lining from a boat at anchor-System of taking marks at sea-Cross marks-Picking up an object lost overboard -Placing the boat at anchor-Whiffing or railing- Setting pots, long lines, floating trots and trammels-Trawling-The Beam trawl-The Otter trawl-Shrimp trawling and dredging-Seining -Sand-eel seining-Fish spearing-Fishing amongst rocks and sands at low water-Catching lobsters in their burrows-Razor fishing with salt and wire-Bisque soup 438
 
CHAPTER XXV
A history of the pastime of yachting -Variety of types-Cod's head and mackerel tail-Origin of old tonnage rules -Capacity- Builders' measurement and Thames measurement-The schooner America's visit in 1851-Plank-on-edge type-The Jullanar-Broad keels and outside lead- Development of extreme plank-on-edge-New era of more moderate vessels under Length and Sail Area Rule-Vessels of extremely light displacement-On -design classes-Evolution of type under first and second linear-rating rules - The scantling question - Handicap racing and modern cruising yachts-The Magdalen type-Lord Dunraven's Audrey referred to-The coming of the International Rule and yachts built under it-Modern sail plans-General comparison of yachts of different periods, 1863-1911 463
 
CHAPTER XXVI
Remarks on cruising- Yachting localities and where to keep a boat-The Cruising Association and its work useful to small-boat men-The cost of small yachts - Seaworthy type-Question of rig.- The hull-Methods of reefing- Treatment of sails-Laying to-Sea anchor-Handling a yacht in bad weather-The dinghy-Lamps-The use of the motor-Anchors and chains-Paid hands, their wages, clothes, and the general cost of running a yacht-Six hands--Three hands-Full crew-Short-handed with amateurs at less cost- Racing money-Plans of a 6-ton cruiser and a I 5-ton cruiser .
 
CHAPTER XXVII
Altered conditions of yachting after the war- In crease of cost-Reduction of Sail Area necessary to meet increased cost in 1920-2-The new International Rating Rule, 1920, and Length and Sail Area Measurement- Table of Measurements of a 7-metre yacht, showing how the Rating is calculated by the New International Rule-An exposition of the Rule showing it to be Length and Sail Area only-An approximate method of finding, any Yacht's Rating by the 1920 Rule-Table of possible measurements for 6-metre Yachts by New International Rule 545

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2003

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